NL Sermon Resources: Feb. 28, 2016

Textweek.com is one of my go-to’s for commentaries and other resources, but occasionally there aren’t a lot of resources there; so I go scrounging on my own. Here’s what I found, may it help you too!

Here’s the textweek site for Feb 28, 2016 – http://textweek.com/Narrative%20Lectionary/N2Lent3.htm

Here are other commentaries on Mark 12:1-12 that I found with a brief blurb on each:

  • Working Preacher commentary (2012). “In a time of social chaos, including conflict with other Jewish people and conflict within their own households, Mark uses the parable of the wicked servants to assure members of the congregation they have a place in the vineyard by following Jesus and being committed to the community of the Realm.”
  • Commentary by David Lose (2012). “Read this way, this parable is not about justice or judgment only, but also and primarily about love, God’s love for each and all of us.”
  • RevGalBlogPals commentary on both Mark 12:1-12 and Mark 12:13-17. “The gospel is always dangerous with its challenge, its radical statements and its unflinching truth. But these two passages are often (mis)appropriated to make them even more so.”
  • Devotions on Mark 12:1-12 by Kevin Ruffcorn.
  • Lectio Divina resource on the text from the Order of The Carmelites. “What does this parable teach us concerning the way of exercising authority? And you, how do you exercise your authority in the family, in the community and in your work?”
  • Commentary by Geoff Thomas (2004). “Theologically what do we find here at the heart of Mark’s gospel? The doctrine of the eternal Sonship of Christ. Before his birth in the stable at Bethlehem he was God the Son. “He came down to earth from heaven, who is God and Lord of all,” wrote Cecil Francis Alexander in one of her hymns for children.”
  • Article by Wim J. C. Weren (1998). “This article attempts to prove the following theses. The parable of the tenants in Mark 12,1-12 has been constructed on the basis of the vineyard song in Isa 5,1-7. There are connections with the Hebrew text as well as with the LXX version.”

I may add more to this during the week.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s